Fall 2018 HRA Members’ Meeting (Durham)

November 15-16, 2018

Additional Event Info: Meeting Agenda | Hotel Reservation Link | Click here to register

Meeting Info

UPDATE (9/12/2018): We have rescheduled this meeting for November 15-16, 2018. A new registration link was sent on 9/17/2018 with an October 15, 2018 deadline to register.  If you did not receive the link to register please contact Annette.  Please see above for the hotel registration link.

This meeting covers the following topics:

  • Measuring Funding Impact Through Grantee Outputs (Thur)
  • FIRST Group Update (Thur)
  • Peer Review Under the Microscope: From Best Practices to Current Challenges (Thur)
  • Implementing New Ways to Model Human Disease for More Effective Drug Discovery (Fri)
  • Stronger Together: How Collaboration Can Lead to Greater Impact (Fri)

Meeting Agenda

November 15, Thursday

10:30 – 11:00AM

(30 min)

Welcome to the Members’ Meeting and Introductions

2:00PM - 3:30PM

(90min)

Measuring Funding Impact Through Grantee Outputs

Measuring the impact of a non-profit organization’s grants program can be a difficult, and sometimes ambiguous, process. For example, answering a seemingly simple question like, “how successful are we at accomplishing our mission?”, typically results in more questions than definitive or tangible answers. One approach to gauging organizational success is to measure the success of grant recipients that result from an organization’s support. This session will explore how to connect grantees to landmark discoveries in their particular field based on outputs collected from progress reports. In addition, we will look at ways to examine these outputs, either individually or in aggregate, to more broadly evaluate the health and success of a grants program. Lastly, we will discuss why these data are important and how they can be leveraged for communications to stakeholders, donors, and the public will be discussed.

Moderator

Carole Wegner, PhD

VP, Research and Grants Administration| The V Foundation for Cancer Research

bio coming soon

Presenters

Samuel Thomas

Chief Technology Officer and Project Manager | Rose Li and Associates

Samuel Thomas is Chief Technology Officer at Rose Li and Associates, Inc., a professional services firm specializing in research and analysis, science writing, and project management. He currently oversees the development of the Continuous Innovation Indicators™ (CII), an innovative tool to track progress in cancer research. Supported by Lilly Oncology’s PACE initiative, the CII is freely available for researchers, patient advocates, and the public to explore the evidence base supporting effective treatments for 13 tumor types and visualize remaining unmet needs. Mr. Thomas has experience in program evaluation, policy analysis, and science writing. He leads teams of analysts, writers, and software developers to support the needs of research-centric clients in the private, non-profit, and public sectors. Previously, Mr. Thomas worked for the IDA Science and Technology Policy Institute, where he provided research and analytical support to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and other federal agencies. Mr. Thomas holds a BS from Columbia University.

Natalia Volfovsky, PhD

Director, Data and Analytics | Simons Foundation

bio coming soon

Alycia Halladay, PhD

Chief Science Officer | Autism Science Foundation

Alycia Halladay is the Chief Science Officer for the Autism Science Foundation, where she oversees the scientific activities, grants, and initiatives of ASF. The Autism Science Foundation focuses on investments in junior level career researchers to both improve scientific discovery while training the next generation of scientists using cutting edge technologies. These awards include pre and post doctoral fellowships, undergraduate awards, accelerator grants, the Autism Sisters Project and the Baby Siblings Research Consortium. In addition, the Autism Science Foundation provides outreach and communication support to the Autism BrainNet, helping to explain the importance of this program to families and individuals with ASD. Prior to joining ASF in 2014, she served as the Senior Director of Clinical and Environmental Sciences at Autism Speaks. She received a PhD in biopsychology from Rutgers in 2001 and completed a postdoctoral fellowship in pharmacology and toxicology at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of NJ in 2004. She still holds a faculty appointment at Rutgers.

12:30PM – 2:00 PM

(90 min)

First Group Update over lunch (separate networking lunch area will be provided)

This session will provide context for and discuss recent activities aimed at building effective working relationships between funders and universities. We will report on topics addressed at the May 16th Nonprofit Funder - Research Institution Partnership Workshop, and on progress since the workshop. We will discuss next steps for the effort in general and the three different workstreams: Intellectual Property, Streamlining Reporting Requirements, and Indirect Costs. Those who led the sessions at the workshop and are continuing to engage with universities will lead the discussions.

Moderator

TBD

Presenters

Heather Snyder, PhD

Senior Director, Medical & Scientific Relations | Alzheimer’s Association

Heather M. Snyder, Ph.D., is Senior Director of Medical and Scientific Operations at the Alzheimer’s Association. Dr. Snyder manages the Association's International Research Grant Program, through which the Association funds research around the world. She oversees the Association’s relationship with the leading disease journal in clinical neurology, Alzheimer’s & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association, and its two companion open access journals. She is responsible for implementing the Alzheimer’s Association Women’s Alzheimer’s Research Initiative and leads the Association’s efforts to understand the role of vascular factors in Alzheimer's and dementia.Dr. Snyder earned a Ph.D. from Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, and a bachelor’s degree in Biology and Religious Studies from The University of Virginia.

Jim Luther, PhD

Associate VP Finance & Compliance Officer | Duke University

bio coming soon

Jackie Hausman

Director, Research and Regulatory Relations | Kenneth Rainin Foundation

bio coming soon

Diane Bovenkamp, PhD

Vice President of Scientific Affairs | BrightFocus Foundation

Diane Bovenkamp, PhD, Vice President of Scientific Affairs, oversees all of BrightFocus Foundation’s research programs, serves as the scientific liaison for the organization in local, national, and international forums, and identifies and develops new research initiatives, partnerships, and funding policies consistent with the mission of BrightFocus. Prior to assuming her current position, Dr. Bovenkamp served as the Scientific Program Officer and Science Communications Specialist at BrightFocus, and as Director of Science Information and Programs at Foundation Fighting Blindness. Dr. Bovenkamp obtained her PhD in Biochemistry from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, discovering and studying Eph receptors in angiogenesis and neural development in zebrafish and mice. She completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, isolating and characterizing zebrafish neuropilins. Dr. Bovenkamp conducted further research at the Johns Hopkins University Bayview Proteomics Center in the Division of Cardiology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, using proteomic techniques for biomarker detection in human serum.

Calvin Ho, PhD

Science Project Coordinator | Tuberous Sclerosis Alliance

bio coming soon

Amy Laster, PhD

Senior Director, Grants and Award Programs | Foundation Fighting Blindness

bio coming soon

2:00PM - 3:30PM

(90 min)

Peer Review Under the Microscope: From Best Practices to Current Challenges

Scientific peer review has long been the gold standard for evaluating grant applications, but different organizations implement peer review in different ways. In addition, issues like unconscious bias and data reproducibility has brought these processes under greater scrutiny. This session will focus on peer review best practices that are informed by studies on the science of peer review.

Moderator

Diane Bovenkamp, PhD

Vice President of Scientific Affairs | BrightFocus Foundation

Diane Bovenkamp, PhD, Vice President of Scientific Affairs, oversees all of BrightFocus Foundation’s research programs, serves as the scientific liaison for the organization in local, national, and international forums, and identifies and develops new research initiatives, partnerships, and funding policies consistent with the mission of BrightFocus. Prior to assuming her current position, Dr. Bovenkamp served as the Scientific Program Officer and Science Communications Specialist at BrightFocus, and as Director of Science Information and Programs at Foundation Fighting Blindness. Dr. Bovenkamp obtained her PhD in Biochemistry from Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario, Canada, discovering and studying Eph receptors in angiogenesis and neural development in zebrafish and mice. She completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship in the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children’s Hospital/Harvard Medical School, isolating and characterizing zebrafish neuropilins. Dr. Bovenkamp conducted further research at the Johns Hopkins University Bayview Proteomics Center in the Division of Cardiology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in Baltimore, Maryland, using proteomic techniques for biomarker detection in human serum.

Presenters

Stephen Gallo, PhD

Chief Scientist | American Institute of Biological Sciences

Dr. Stephen Gallo is the Chief Scientist for the Scientific Peer Advisory and Review Services (SPARS) division of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS), providing scientific, technical and administrative oversight over peer review operations and senior leadership to AIBS SPARS. He was worked with AIBS staff to analyze peer review data and publish these anonymized results in the open-access literature to further the empirical database upon which the best practices in peer review are based. He has also worked to create a webinar series to generate conversations around this topic (see link below). He received his PhD in Biophysics from the University of Buffalo and worked as a post-doctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health in the field of HIV research. A link to our publications and webinars is below: https://spars.aibs.org/our-impact.html

Lucy Liaw, PhD

Director, Research Training Programs | Maine Medical Center Research Institute

Lucy Liaw received her PhD at the University of Washington in the area of signaling in vascular biology. She then performed a postdoctoral fellowship at Vanderbilt University, learning about mouse genome modification and developmental biology. After completing the fellowship, she moved to Maine Medical Center Research Institute to start her independent research laboratory. In the past 20 years, her research has focused on vascular biology, signaling pathways, and the impact of metabolic disease on vascular health. She also established and leads an institutional Mouse Transgenic Facility at Maine Medical Center, and is the Director of Research Training Programs. She has been continuously involved in peer review for the American Heart Association and the National Institutes of Health, and is particularly interested in mentorship of trainees and young investigators. She currently leads a Center of Excellence in the area of metabolic networks, and holds academic appointments at the University of Maine and Tufts University.

Richard Nakamura, PhD

Former Director (2011-2018) | Center for Scientific Review, National Institutes of Health

From 2011 to his retirement from Federal service in April 2018, Richard Nakamura, Ph.D. was Director of the Center for Scientific Review (CSR) at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). He led CSR’s 500 scientists and administrative staff, overseeing their efforts to manage 80,000 incoming NIH grant applications a year and review the majority of them in CSR peer review groups. CSR holds about 1,500 review meetings a year, involving about 16,000 reviewers from the scientific community.Before 2011, Dr. Nakamura had a 32-year tenure at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), where he has served as both Scientific Director and Deputy Director of the institute. He served as Acting Director from 2001 to 2002. During his time at NIMH, he received a number of leadership awards, including the Presidential Rank Award for outstanding leadership.He came to NIMH in 1976 as a postdoctoral fellow. In the mid-80’s he coordinated NIMH’s Biobehavioral Program and later was Chief of its Integrative Neuroscience Research Branch. Between 1997 and 2007, he served as the institute’s Deputy Director. From 2007 to 2011 he was institute Scientific Director. While at NIMH, he also has held other positions, including Associate Director for Science Policy and Program Planning and Coordinator, ADAMHA Office of Animal Research Issues.Dr. Nakamura attended the Bronx High School of Science and earned his B.A. in psychology from Earlham College. He received his Ph.D. in psychology from the State University of New York in Stony Brook. Dr. Nakamura has expertise in a number of areas, including the grant award and policy process at NIH, cognitive and comparative neuroscience, and ethics in science. He has published 30 peer reviewed scientific journal articles, most related to neurocognition in primates.

3:30PM - 4:00PM

(30 min)

Break

4:00PM - 5:00PM

(60 min)

Highlighting our Sponsors

Moderator

Maryrose Franko, PhD

Executive Director | Health Research Alliance

Presenters

Rolly Simpson

Senior Program Officer | Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Rolly L. Simpson joined the Burroughs Wellcome Fund (BWF) in 1995. He currently manages the Career Awards for Medical Scientists program, a bridging award for physician scientists, the Physician Scientist Institutional Award program, and BWF’s reproductive science programs that includes the Preterm Birth Initiative. Prior to joining BWF, Mr. Simpson worked for 22 years in the Wellcome Research Laboratories of Burroughs Wellcome Co. USA, where he was successively a staff specialist, section head, and manager of the Technical Information Department. Early in his career he was an assistant research scientist in the Industrial Development Division of the Engineering Experiment Station at the Georgia Institute of Technology and subsequently received a faculty appointment as an instructor in library/information services at Georgia Tech. Following high school, he enlisted in the United States Marine Corps Reserve and was honorably discharged with the rank of Sergeant. He subsequently received his undergraduate degree in Chemistry from Oglethorpe University and master’s degree in library/information science from Emory University. Mr. Simpson received an NIH grant to work as a postgraduate trainee under the mentorship of Dr. John Autian in the Materials Science Toxicology Laboratory in the Schools of Pharmacy and Dentistry at the University of Tennessee Medical Units at Memphis where he received a post-master’s diploma. He has published in the area of information management. He currently is a member of the Reproductive Scientist Development Program Executive Committee and is a member of the Keystone Symposia Diversity Advisory Committee. He was previously on the advisory board of GradPortal. In 2010, Mr. Simpson received the Beacon Award which is awarded by the Board of Scientific Counselors and Faculty of the Frontiers in Reproduction Research (FIR) Program at the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts, for his efforts in providing guidance to the FIR program.

Susan Braun

Chief Executive Officer | V Foundation for Cancer Research

bio coming soon

6:30PM - 9:00PM

(2.5 hours)

Reception With Heavy Hors D’Oeuvres at the Burroughs Wellcome Fund

Roundtrip transportation between the Washington Duke Inn and the Burroughs Wellcome Fund will be provided

November 16, Friday

8:00 – 9:30AM

(90 min)

Breakfast: Breakouts & Networking

9:30 – 10:15AM

(45 min)

HRA News & Updates

10:15 – 10:45AM

(30 min)

Break

10:45AM – 12:15PM

(90 min)

Implementing New Ways to Model Human Disease for More Effective Drug Discovery

The cost of drug R&D makes up the bulk of the cost of prescription drugs because consumers not only pay for the medicines they are prescribed, but also for all the ostensibly promising agents emerging for the laboratory only to fail in clinical trials. The preclinical drug discovery and testing phases are filled with challenges and have a poor success rate especially in certain disease without good preclinical models.This session will explore ways to change the drug discovery paradigm with novel strategies such as machine learning and other technologies which are expected to make the drug discovery quicker, cheaper and more effective.

Moderator

James Hendrix, PhD

Director, Global Science Initiatives | Alzheimer’s Association

James A. Hendrix, Ph.D., is director, global science initiatives, at the Alzheimer’s Association. As a member of the Medical and Scientific Relations Division, he provides leadership on specific domestic and international efforts focused on advancing the division’s science agenda. A critical element of his role is to manage industry consortia such as the Alzheimer’s Association Research Roundtable (AARR); lead the Global Biomarker Standardization Consortium; manage and direct future meeting efforts and output; and assist with the coordination of the $100 million dollar Imaging Dementia—Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (IDEAS) Study on the clinical usefulness of amyloid PET imaging.Dr. Hendrix received his Ph.D. and a postdoctoral fellowship from Colorado State University. Before joining the Alzheimer’s Association, Dr. Hendrix was a pharmaceutical scientist with a focus on drug discovery for CNS diseases. Dr. Hendrix spent 18 years working at Sanofi-Aventis and predecessor companies, where he rose to level of senior director, U.S. site head for CNS research. He also spent two years working in the biotech industry with various companies, including companies focused on the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Presenters

Han Lim, MD, PhD

Vice President, Global Head of Partnering | Atomwise, Inc

Dr. Han Lim MD PhD is the Vice President and Global Head of Partnering at Atomwise Inc., a biotechnology company in San Francisco that uses artificial intelligence for preclinical drug discovery and development. Han creates partnerships with researchers in companies and academic institutions to innovate and speed-up drug development using Atomwise's technology for the discovery of novel and diverse small molecules that bind to specific target proteins and for lead optimization. Han trained as a medical doctor in Australia and then pursued a PhD in pediatrics and medical genetics at the University of Cambridge, and performed postdoctoral research in the Department of Physics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Before joining Atomwise, Han was on the faculty at the University of California, Berkeley and his lab's research field was systems biology and bioengineering.

Paul Macklin, PhD

Associate Professor | Intelligent Systems Engineering, Indiana University

Paul Macklin is a mathematician and an Associate Professor of Intelligent Systems Engineering at Indiana University. He is developing a “virtual laboratory” to help scientists assess and engineer the systems-level effects of current and emerging cancer treatments by simulating how cells interact in 3-D tissues. Dr. Macklin uses a highly collaborative, open source / open science approach to accelerate this work while building cross-disciplinary, multi-institutional teams that pool expertise to create shared mathematical and computational tools. He founded and leads several open source projects, including PhysiCell (simulates many cells as they interact in 3-D tissues), BioFVM (solves for diffusion of signaling factors, oxygen, and drugs), and MultiCellDS (standards for sharing multicellular data). These tools have been applied to primary and metastatic breast cancer, metastases in liver tissue, and most recently cancer immunology. To learn more, visit MathCancer.org.

Rick Monsma, PhD

Senior Vice President, Scientific Operations | New York Stem Cell Foundation Research Institute

bio coming soon

12:15PM - 1:45 PM

(90 min)

LUNCH: BREAKOUTS & NETWORKING

1:45PM - 3:15 PM

(90 min)

Stronger Together: How Collaboration Can Lead to Greater Impact

Collaboration is often the key to scientific success, bringing together individuals with different expertise and skills to advance the field. This type of teamwork can also elevate and improve the efforts of biomedical research grant makers, bringing organizations together toward a common mission. This session will focus on a few examples of successful collaboration between HRA members, as well as HRA members and the public sector, that served to not only provide crucial resources to the research community, but also to advance scientific knowledge and patient care. Members will share their stories on how these collaborations were forged, how working with other organizations contributes to and improves their mission-driven work, and what they hope to accomplish from establishing such symbiotic relationships.

Moderator

Nicole Burpo

Manager, Focused Research | American Heart Association

bio coming soon

Presenters

Shannon Gallagher-Colombo, PhD

Assistant Director | AACR Foundation

James Hendrix, PhD

Director, Global Science Initiatives | Alzheimer’s Association

James A. Hendrix, Ph.D., is director, global science initiatives, at the Alzheimer’s Association. As a member of the Medical and Scientific Relations Division, he provides leadership on specific domestic and international efforts focused on advancing the division’s science agenda. A critical element of his role is to manage industry consortia such as the Alzheimer’s Association Research Roundtable (AARR); lead the Global Biomarker Standardization Consortium; manage and direct future meeting efforts and output; and assist with the coordination of the $100 million dollar Imaging Dementia—Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (IDEAS) Study on the clinical usefulness of amyloid PET imaging.Dr. Hendrix received his Ph.D. and a postdoctoral fellowship from Colorado State University. Before joining the Alzheimer’s Association, Dr. Hendrix was a pharmaceutical scientist with a focus on drug discovery for CNS diseases. Dr. Hendrix spent 18 years working at Sanofi-Aventis and predecessor companies, where he rose to level of senior director, U.S. site head for CNS research. He also spent two years working in the biotech industry with various companies, including companies focused on the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Kristin Mueller, PhD

Scientific Program Director | Melanoma Research Alliance

Joe Cotter

Research Constituent Engagement Manager | American Cancer Society

Bio coming soon

3:15PM - 3:30PM

(15 min)

Closing remarks